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Admission Policy
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Course Description

Saint Bede’s Anglican Catholic Theological College

Saint Bede’s Anglican Catholic Theological College is a ‘virtual college’, established in 2002 to serve the needs of the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada and the Traditional Anglican Communion in the academic and pastoral training of men for the ordained ministry; and to provide post-ordination training and programs for those already ordained.

Saint Bede’s Anglican Catholic Theological College is a not-for-profit post-secondary theological institution incorporated under the laws of the Province of British Columbia. The College is operated and funded through the Saint Bede’s Anglican Catholic Theological College Society, a not-for-profit society and registered charity. The College is governed by a Board of Regents and is administered on a day-to-day basis by the President of the College, assisted by the Academic Dean (who is responsible for the academic program and evaluation of all students).

Saint Bede’s Anglican Catholic Theological College provides candidates for ordination the necessary theological study, spiritual formation and pastoral training for ordination to the Sacred Orders of Deacon and Priest in accordance with the canonical requirements of The Anglican Catholic Church of Canada (Traditional Anglican Communion). The preparation and training for ordination is divided into three components: spiritual formation, academic study, and ministry training. In this way, the candidate for ordination is exposed not only to the study of theology, but also to the spiritual, liturgical, and pastoral dimensions of the ordained ministry. This preparation enables the candidate to discern God’s will for his life and to undertake an intensive period of study and spiritual examination.

As a ‘virtual’ theological college, St. Bede’s Anglican Catholic Theological College offers its program of theological studies and spiritual formation by means of resident tutorials, lectures, directed readings and distance education programs, utilizing computer technology and electronic communications. Candidates for ordination may undertake their studies on either a full-time or part-time basis. Candidates for ordination are required to be active members of their local Parish, and receive practical training and preparation for the ordained ministry in and through prescribed and supervised participation in the life of the parish in its liturgical, sacramental and pastoral ministry. Upon successful completion of the prescribed program of theological studies and ministry preparation, the candidate for ordination is granted a Master of Divinity (M.Div.) or Bachelor of Theology (B.Th.) by the Board of Regents, and is recommended for ordination to the Diocesan Bishop.

 

Degrees & Certificates

  • Certificate in Anglican Studies
  • B. Th. (Bachelor of Theology)
  • M. A. (Master of Arts in Anglican Theology)
  • M. Div. (Master of Divinity)
  • D. D. (honoris causa) (Doctor of Divinity Degree)

 

Admissions Policy

Master of Divinity and Bachelor of Theology Programs:

Admission to the Master of Divinity and Bachelor of Theology programs is granted by the Board of Regents based upon the following criteria and supporting documentation:

  1. Acceptance as a postulant (candidate for ordination) by the Bishop Ordinary of the postulant’s Diocese, as signified by letter from the said Bishop. [Please note that the Bishop Ordinary of the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada requires that a person seeking admission as a candidate for ordination must have been, for at least two years, an active member and regular worshipper at a parish of the Diocese.]
  1. Successful completion of post-secondary education at an accredited university or college; or, its equivalent (as determined by the Board of Regents on a case by case basis).
  1. Completion by the candidate of the Admissions Application Form requiring the following information from the candidate:
  1. a) a copy of Baptism and Confirmation certificates;
  1. b) an outline of religious background;
  1. c) a curriculum vitae setting out both educational and employment background;
  1. d) letters of reference from at least three individuals who are knowledgeable about the candidate, one reference of which must be from the candidate’s parish priest;
  1. e) a medical report from the candidate’s physician, stating that the candidate is of the male sex, and in good physical and mental health;
  1. f) if married, a copy of the Marriage Certificate; as well as, a letter from the candidate’s wife indicating knowledge of and support for her husband’s admission to the College for the purposes of theological training for the ordained ministry. [The candidate must also indicate whether or not this is his first marriage or whether he has been previously married.]
  1. A short essay by the candidate setting out why he is seeking ordination, how he came to the decision to seek ordination, and his understanding of the ordained ministry within the historic Anglican expression of the Catholic Faith in the one, holy, catholic, and apostolic Church.
  1. Upon submission of the candidate’s Application of Admission, the Registrar will notify the candidate of receipt of application.
  1. The Registrar will submit the candidate’s Application for Admission to the President of the College. The President, in conjunction with the Board of Regents, will determine the eligibility of the applicant and whether or not to accept the candidate for admission to the theological program of the College.
  1. As directed by the President of the College, the Registrar will inform the candidate, the

Dean of the College, and the candidate’s Diocesan Bishop, in writing of the student’s admission (or rejection, as the case may be) to the College.

  1. Upon admission to the College, a copy of the candidate’s supporting documentation will be forwarded to the Dean of the College, who will discuss with the student the appropriate course of theological studies, including contact with the appropriate faculty.
  1. Once the student’s initial course of theological studies is determined, the Dean of the College will communicate the student’s course(s) to the Registrar/Bursar of the College so that the Bursar may send to the student the appropriate Tuition Invoice.
  1. As determined by the Board of Regents, the current Tuition for each theological course offered by the College is one hundred dollars ($100); which is to be paid by cheque or money order payable to “St. Bede’s Anglican Catholic Theological College” in Canadian funds (for those students resident in Canada) and in U.S. dollars (for those students resident in the United States of America). For those students resident in a country other than Canada or the United States, the tuition payment will be determined by the Bursar in consultation with the President and Treasurer of the College.

 

Master of Arts in Theological Studies

Admission to the Master of Arts in Theological Studies, a program designed for those who seek theological training not leading to ordination, is granted by the Board of Regents based upon the following criteria and supporting documentation:

  1. Acceptance as student by the Bishop Ordinary of the postulant’s Diocese, as signified by letter from the said Bishop.
  1. Successful completion of post-secondary education at an accredited university or college; or, its equivalent (as determined by the Board of Regents on a case by case basis).
  1. Completion by the student of the Admissions Application Form requiring the following information from the student.
  1. a) a copy of Baptism and Confirmation certificates;
  1. b) an outline of religious background;
  1. c) a curriculum vitae setting out both educational and employment background;
  1. d) letters of reference from at least three individuals who are knowledgeable about the student, one reference of which must be from the student’s parish priest;
  1. e) a medical report from the student’s physician, stating that the student is in good physical and mental health;
  1. f) if married, a copy of the Marriage Certificate; as well as, a letter from the student’s spouse indicating knowledge of and support for his or her spouse’s admission to the College for the purposes of theological training.
  1. Upon submission of the candidate’s Application of Admission, the Registrar will notify the candidate of receipt of application.
  1. The Registrar will submit the candidate’s Application for Admission to the President of the College. The President, in conjunction with the Board of Regents, will determine the eligibility of the applicant and whether or not to accept the candidate for admission to the theological program of the College.
  1. As directed by the President of the College, the Registrar will inform the candidate, the

Dean of the College, and the candidate’s Diocesan Bishop, in writing of the student’s admission (or rejection, as the case may be) to the College.

  1. Upon admission to the College, a copy of the candidate’s supporting documentation will be forwarded to the Dean of the College, who will discuss with the student the appropriate course of theological studies, including contact with the appropriate faculty.
  1. Once the student’s initial course of theological studies is determined, the Dean of the College will communicate the student’s course(s) to the Registrar/Bursar of the College so that the Bursar may send to the student the appropriate Tuition Invoice.
  1. As determined by the Board of Regents, the current Tuition for each theological course offered by the College is one hundred dollars ($100); which is to be paid by cheque or money order payable to “St. Bede’s Anglican Catholic Theological College” in Canadian funds (for those students resident in Canada) and in U.S. dollars (for those students resident in the United States of America). For those students resident in a country other than Canada or the United States, the tuition payment will be determined by the Bursar in consultation with the President and Treasurer of the College.

 

Certificate in Anglican Studies

Admission to the Certificate program in Anglican studies, a course of study designed for a member of the laity seeking greater knowledge and understanding of the teachings of the Church, is granted by the Board of Regents based upon the following criteria and supporting documentation:

  1. Acceptance as student by the Bishop Ordinary of the student’s Diocese, as signified by letter from the said Bishop.
  2. Completion of the Admissions Application Form requiring the following information from the applicant:
  3. a) a copy of Baptism and Confirmation certificates;
  4. b) an outline of religious background;
  5. c) a letter of reference from the applicant’s parish priest;
  6. d) a copy of any applicable Transcript(s) from secondary and post-secondary institutions.
  7. A letter from the applicant setting out why he or she is desirous of undertaking the Certificate in Christian Studies program at Saint Bede’s Anglican Catholic Theological College.
  1. Upon submission of the candidate’s Application of Admission, the Registrar will notify the candidate of receipt of application.
  1. The Registrar will submit the candidate’s Application for Admission to the President of the College. The President, in conjunction with the Board of Regents, will determine the eligibility of the applicant and whether or not to accept the candidate for admission to the theological program of the College.
  1. As directed by the President of the College, the Registrar will inform the candidate, the

Dean of the College, and the candidate’s Diocesan Bishop, in writing of the student’s admission (or rejection, as the case may be) to the College.

  1. Upon admission to the College, a copy of the candidate’s supporting documentation will be forwarded to the Dean of the College, who will discuss with the student the appropriate course of theological studies, including contact with the appropriate faculty.
  1. Once the student’s initial course of theological studies is determined, the Dean of the College will communicate the student’s course(s) to the Registrar/Bursar of the College so that the Bursar may send to the student the appropriate Tuition Invoice.
  1. As determined by the Board of Regents, the current Tuition for each theological course offered by the College is one hundred dollars ($100); which is to be paid by cheque or money order payable to “St. Bede’s Anglican Catholic Theological College” in Canadian funds (for those students resident in Canada) and in U.S. dollars (for those students resident in the United States of America). For those students resident in a country other than Canada or the United States, the tuition payment will be determined by the Bursar in consultation with the President and Treasurer of the College.

 

Financial Information:

Tuition is $150.00 per course. Other fees as well as scholarships and awards will vary.

 

Academic Information

 

Academic Standards, Probation, and Disenrolment

Students are expected to maintain the highest level of scholarly integrity, and to meet the standards set by the various programs. A grade of C or better must be achieved in all courses in order to qualify for any degree. A student who fails to do so must repeat the course.

Any student whose cumulative grade average falls below a C will be placed on academic probation. Students who are placed on academic probation, and who do not raise their cumulative grade average may, in consultation with the student’s bishop ordinary, be disenroled from the college.

A student who does not complete course work in a timely manner may be placed on probation or disenroled at the discretion of the bishop ordinary in consultation with the Academic Dean. This usually involves a student who is for some reason or reasons unwilling or unable to continue studies.

 

Statement on Accreditation

St. Bede’s Anglican Catholic Theological College is an official seminary of the TAC, accredited with and by the College of Bishops of the Traditional Anglican Communion. That means that the education and degrees from St. Bede’s are recognized worldwide throughout the TAC. The standards to which St. Bede’s is held are those agreed upon by the College of Bishops, thus we are responsible not only to ourselves but to the TAC as a whole in regards to our teaching and practice.  Our goal is to prepare students for effective work in various Church settings within the Anglican tradition. Various infringements on the doctrinal content of St. Bede’s program do not currently allow for other accreditation, though possible forms of independent accreditation are under consideration, and are being explored. But the highest accreditation the board, faculty, and staff at St. Bede’s seek is from Almighty God, that all teaching and practice be in accord with the teaching and practice of the Church catholic. Under God’s direction, and with attempts to maintain the mind of Christ which is the mind of the Church as expressed in the three Ecumenical Creeds and seven Ecumenical Councils, according to the historic Vincentian Canon (“What has been believed always, everywhere, and by all”), St. Bede’s is pursuing with vigor constant improvements and adaptations to serve the needs of the Church catholic.

 

Courses of Studies

The following courses of studies are designed to help students prepare for service in the Church. Completing these programs of study does not, however, guarantee ordination, which includes a variety of non-academic qualifications, including moral rectitude, spiritual formation, and emotional and intellectual maturity. Ordination is at the discretion of the bishop ordinary of each diocese, and regulated by the distinct requirements of each jurisdiction’s canon law.

Track 1 

This is the track for traditional students, entering seminary studies with a B.A., B.S. or equivalent degree. B100 and B101 may be omitted for students who have already taken and passed these with a grade equivalent of C or better.

Courses Required for Preparation for Ordination to the Diaconate

T100 Christian Philosophy

T101 Introduction to Christian Theology

T102 Christian Apologetics

T110 Moral Theology

T120 Introduction to Ascetical Theology

B100 New Testament (Koine) Greek

B101 Biblical Hebrew

B102 Hermeneutics

B103 Introduction to the Old Testament

B105 Introduction to the New Testament Epistles: Romans and 1 Corinthians

B110 The Synoptic Gospels

B115 The Johannine Scriptures: the Gospel, Epistles, and Apocalypse

H105 Councils, Creeds, and Heresies

H110 Historic Anglican Writings and Divines

H120 Introduction to Christian Liturgy

H130 The Book of Common Prayer & the Missals

C100 Canon Law and Polity

PR100 Liturgical and Practical Ministry of a Deacon/Practical Training in Liturgy

PR 101 Introduction to Homiletics

PR 102 Christian Education and Missions

 

Courses Required for Preparation for Ordination to the Priesthood

B200 The Pentateuch

B205 The Historical Writings and the Prophets

B207 Poetry and Wisdom Literature

B220 The Pauline and Catholic Epistles

H200 Patristics

H201 Church History: Early Church and the Medieval Church

H202 Church History: The Reformation to the Present

T220 Spiritual Direction

T230 Theology Proper (God, the Trinity), Cosmology & Anthropology

T240 Christology & Soteriology

T250 Ecclesiology & Eschatology

T260 Sacramental Theology

C201 Introduction to World Religions

PR200 Liturgical and Practical Ministry of a Priest/Practical Training in Liturgy

PR 201 Pastoral Theology

PR 205 Parish Ministry and Administration

 

The course work in practical theology includes, as part of the PR100 and PR 200 courses, field work and a short term meeting at a satellite location for practical, hands on work under the supervision of a qualified priest.

 

Track 2

This is the track for non-traditional students, who enter from a variety of other backgrounds.

Courses Required for Preparation for Ordination to the Diaconate

T100 Christian Philosophy

T101 Introduction to Christian Theology

T102 Christian Apologetics

T110 Moral Theology

T120 Introduction to Ascetical Theology

B102 Hermeneutics: Interpretation of Scripture

B104 Introduction to the Old Testament and Basic Tools for Old Testament Exegesis

B106 Introduction to the New Testament New Testament Epistles: Romans and 1 Corinthians and Basic Tools for New Testament Exegesis

B107 Introduction to the Gospels

H100 Church History: Early Church and the Medieval Church

H101 Church History: The Reformation to the Present

H105 Councils, Creeds, and Heresies

H110 Historic Anglican Writings and Divines

H120 Introduction to Christian Liturgy

H130 The Book of Common Prayer & the Missals

C100  Canon Law and Polity

PR100 Liturgical and Practical Ministry of a Deacon/Practical Training in Liturgy

PR 101 Introduction to Homiletics

PR 102 Christian Education and Missions

 

Courses Required for Preparation for Ordination to the Priesthood

This is the same as in Track 1

 

Track 3

The specific course listings for the track will be determined by the student’s Bishop Ordinary, in consultation with the Academic Dean.  It is designed for those who already have a higher degree in theology.

Electives for Tracks 1 through 3

B110 Ecclesiastical Latin

C200 Islam

T200 Christian Apologetics

PR 204 Advanced Homiletics

PR 250 Fundamentals of Church Music

 

Track 4

Those who wish to serve the Church as deaconesses must meet the requirements canon law that apply in their diocese, and be approved by the bishop ordinary. The guidelines in each code of canon law differ, so the course requirements will be tailored to meet those specific guidelines out of the master course lists given above. The canons usually have requirements in the areas of Holy Scripture, Church history, Dogmatic Theology, Christian education and missions, administration, and practical training in matters specific to the office of deaconess.  

 

Track 5

The guidelines for a Subdeacon preparation program, for those diocese that have such, likewise follow the guidelines of each jurisdiction and diocese, and will be worked out with the bishop ordinary of the diocese.

 

Track 6 

This track is designed to lead to a Certificate in Anglican Studies. It is designed to give the student a very broad introductory understanding of Anglican thought and history.

T101 Introduction to Christian Theology

H110 Historic Anglican Writings and Divines

H120 Introduction to Christian Liturgy

H130 The Book of Common Prayer & the Missals

 

Course Descriptions

T100 Christian Philosophy 

Classical philosophy, along with the language of the biblical texts themselves, has provided the framework and the foundational language for the theological thought of the Church almost from the beginning. Therefore, in order to understand theology, a basic familiarity with philosophical thought and language is necessary. This course provides this foundation by introducing important terms, concepts, and figures of classical philosophy.

 

T101 Introduction to Christian Theology 

This course will provide an introduction and overview of Christian theology. In addition to an examination of historical figures, periods, and the development of thought during the Church’s history, there will be an examination of the sources of Tradition and basic theological methodology (Prolegomena). Christian doctrines that will be studied include the Trinity, Christology, Ecclesiology, Sin and Grace, the Sacraments, and Eschatology. Both orthodox catholic theology and some modern trends will be examined, so that the student is better informed concerning recent developments and challenges to the Faith.

 

T102 Christian Apologetics

In this course students will be introduced to the basics of defending Christian doctrine. It is designed to introduce the student to ways of thinking theologically in response to criticisms from other religions. It is also designed to help the student more clearly understand Christian teaching by learning to respond to criticisms from outside the Faith. Topics for the course include the nature and existence of God, cosmology, theodicy, the Person of Christ, eschatology, and the relationship of Christianity to other religions.

 

T110 Moral Theology

An examination of the scriptural foundations, and fundamental principles, of moral theology.   The course will explore man’s end, the nature of human actions and their morality, the standards of God’s law as understood historically by the Church, the nature and role of conscience, the nature of sin, and the nature and categories of virtues (and the vices they combat).

 

T-120 Introduction to Ascetical Theology

An introduction to the classic vocabulary and theological understanding of the spiritual life. The student will become familiar with the essential concepts, and be exposed to the most important elements of the spiritual life in the history of the Church, with a strong emphasis on the writings and ideas most influential in the Anglican Catholic tradition

 

B100 New Testament (Koine) Greek                      

A two semester (or equivalent) study in the basic elements of New Testament Greek, including vocabulary, grammar and syntax, and the proper use of standard language tools in exegesis.

 

B101 Biblical Hebrew                                                                                  

A two semester (or equivalent) study in the basic elements of biblical Hebrew, including vocabulary, grammar and syntax, and the proper use of standard language tools in exegesis.

 

 

B102 Hermeneutics                                                                                      

The interpretation of Scripture lies at the heart of many of the changes and disagreements afflicting the modern Church. How one interprets Scripture thus shapes how and what one believes regarding revelation, as well as the Church’s teachings. This course will familiarize the student with the classical orthodox methods of  understanding and interpreting Scripture, thus giving him the tools he needs to read, understand, and teach Scripture as the Church’s book,  in accord with Holy Tradition.

 

B103 Introduction to the Old Testament                                       

Understanding the Old Testament is vital for an orthodox and catholic reading and interpretation of the New Testament and Early Church Fathers. This introductory course gives a preliminary overview of the Old Testament, providing an understanding of its organization, literary genres, formation, and theology. In this course the candidate will develop an historical understanding of the origins of the Hebrew people, and their formation into a national geographical and political entity, as well as the movements of God’s plan of salvation, worked out through the correction and trials of His people. This provides essential context for understanding Jesus, the Early Church, and the New Testament.

 

B104 Introduction to the Old Testament and Basic Tools for Old Testament Exegesis

Understanding the Old Testament is vital for an orthodox and catholic reading and interpretation of the New Testament and Early Church Fathers. This introductory course gives a preliminary overview of the Old Testament, providing an understanding of its organization, literary genres, formation, and theology. In this course the candidate will develop an historical understanding of the origins of the Hebrew people, and their formation into a national geographical and political entity, as well as the movements of God’s plan of salvation, worked out through the correction and trials of His people. This provides essential context for understanding Jesus, the Early Church, and the New Testament. This course also includes some basic elements of Hebrew (the alphabet, how to use Hebrew lexicons and other tools). It is designed for those who have not have two semesters of Biblical Hebrew.

 

B105 Introduction to the New Testament Epistles: Romans and 1 Corinthians

The New Testament texts are the narrative of the Person and work of Our Lord Jesus Christ, the Apostles, and first century Christians. Understanding it is essential for an orthodox catholic understanding of the Christian Faith.  This introductory course gives a preliminary overview of the New Testament epistles, with focus on Romans and 1 Corinthians.  Emphasis is placed on the organization, literary genres, formation, and theology of the texts, as well as their importance for the origins and development of the Christian community, and her formation into a major religion in the Roman Empire.

 

B106 Introduction to the New Testament New Testament Epistles: Romans and 1 Corinthians and Basic Tools for New Testament Exegesis

This course is the same as B105, but includes some basic elements of Greek (the alphabet, how to use Greek lexicons and other tools). It is designed for those who have not have two semesters of Biblical Greek.

 

B107 Introduction to the Gospels

This is combination of B110 and B115, is a somewhat abbreviated form, for those in track 2. The Synoptic Gospels – Matthew, Mark, and Luke – will be examined in terms of their parallels, as well as their specific emphases and themes. Some discussion of the relationships between these Gospels will also be included. The theological nature of St. John’s Gospel will be examined, particularly as if defines the catholic understanding of the nature of Christ and the sacraments.

 

B110 The Synoptic Gospels  

The Synoptic Gospels – Matthew, Mark, and Luke – will be examined in terms of their parallels, as well as their specific emphases and themes. Some discussion of the relationships between these Gospels will also be included. Each student will focus on one of the three Gospels, and explore a particular element of that Gospel in more depth in a research paper.                

                                                 

B115 The Johannine Scriptures: the Gospel, Epistles, and the Apocalypse  

This course will study the Scriptures attributed by the Church to the Apostle and Evangelist, St. John. The theological nature of St. John’s Gospel will be examined, particularly as if defines the catholic understanding of the nature of Christ and the sacraments. The Epistles of St. John and the Apocalypse will also be studied, and the connections, both thematic and structural between the Gospel and the Apocalypse will be explored.

 

H105 Councils, Creeds, and Heresies                                               

Focusing on the Seven Ecumenical Councils, this course will examine the foundation of the Church’s teaching on the Person of Christ and the Holy Trinity. It will also pay close attention to the various heresies concerning the dogmas connected to Christ and the Trinity that arose during this time, including the history and proponents of those heresies and how the Church responded to them. Treatment will also be given to the Church’s position on images, as outlined in the Seventh Ecumenical Council.

 

H110 Historic Anglican Writings and Divines                               

This survey course covers the central themes in the theological development of Anglicanism, discussing her most influential authors, historical influences, and ideas, emphasizing the place of the Book of Common Prayer, the Thirty Nine Articles, the Caroline Divines, and the Oxford Movement. The student will develop an understanding of the “theological method” of Anglicanism, and will study the origins, development, and place of traditional Anglicanism in the one, holy, catholic and apostolic Church, with emphasis on the Traditional Anglican Communion.

 

H120 Introduction to Christian Liturgy                                        

The history of the Liturgy of the Christian Church will be examined through a study of the various liturgical families and liturgical forms in both the eastern and Western traditions. Particular emphasis will be placed on the development of the Liturgy in the English Church, and the Book of Common Prayer.

 

H130 The Book of Common Prayer & the Missals                                   

This course is designed to insure that students have a grounded understanding of the Prayer Book, and the canonically approved resources connected to it, including the various Missals. This includes a grasp of the historical developments in Christian liturgy in Anglicanism, both before and after 1549. Questions to be examined include: What, besides a few collects, did Cranmer create that was new in the Prayer book? Is the Book of Common Prayer the “perfect worship aid” for catholic Christians, or is it, to some extent, in its various revisions, a compromise between warring factions that have always existed within Anglicanism? Are there questionable inclusions; are there unwarranted omissions? How do the changes made in the various Missals relate to these questions?

 

C100 Canon Law and Polity  

This course examines the history and development of canon law, and ecclesiastical government, with special attention to its purpose and use in the Traditional Anglican Communion, and her member Churches. Specific investigation of the canons of the jurisdiction of the student will be assigned, so that the students gains an understanding of how canon law applies to various issues in the Church, including matters such as sacramental marriage, and authority and decision making in the Church.

.

PR100 Liturgical and Practical Ministry of a Deacon/Practical Training in Liturgy                                                   

This course will study the practical application of the student’s theological studies to the liturgical and pastoral ministry of a deacon. Students will learn, through both academic and hands-on practice, how to perform the various liturgical functions required of a deacon, including in the Divine Offices and the Mass. In terms of pastoral ministry, emphasis will be placed on parish visiting, home communions, ministry to the sick and dying, as well as to pastoral counseling and marriage preparation.  The course work in practical theology includes, as part of the course, field work and a short term meeting at a satellite location for practical, hands on work under the supervision of a qualified priest.

 

PR 101 Introduction to Homiletics                                                 

An introduction to the proclamation of the Word in the Liturgy.  The focus is both academic and experiential, involving an exploration of characteristics of proclamation in Church history, and in the various elements of strategies for communicating God’s Word today.

 

PR 102 Christian Education and Missions

An introduction to the main ideas and texts connected, historically, to the Church’s understanding and practice of mission and catechesis.

 

B200 The Pentateuch                                                                       

This course will offer an in-depth study of the first five books of the Old Testament. Attention will be given to theological message, literary structure, and the history of the interpretation of these texts within the Church. Themes to be explored will include creation, covenant, law, and liturgy and priesthood, seen within the context of God’s oikonomia, of Family Plan of Salvation.

 

B205 The Historical Writings and the Prophets

This course will give a more in-depth examination of the books of Joshua through Esther, as well as the books of Judith and Maccabees, and the writings of the Major and Minor Prophets. Major elements of structure and theology will be examined, as well as the nature of prophesy and its importance for the covenant relationship between God and his people.

 

B207 Poetry and Wisdom Literature

This course will offer an in-depth study of the poetry and wisdom literature of the Old Testament, including Job, Psalms, Proverbs, The Song of Songs, Ecclesiastes, Wisdom, and Ecclesiasticus (Sirach). Major themes, as well as the Church ways of understanding and praying these texts will be emphasized, including the connections made with Christ and the Church as the fulfillment of the Old Testament.

 

B220 The Pauline and Catholic Epistles

This course examines the structure and content of the writings of St. Paul, as well as the Catholic (or General) Epistles, focusing on their impact upon the development and theological expression of the Church. Particular emphasis will be placed on the letters to the Ephesians, Hebrews, and the letters of Peter and 1 John.

 

H200 Church History: Early Church and the Medieval Church            

This survey course will study the major events, personalities, and forces that shaped the Christian Church from the first centuries up to the just before the Reformation period. The material will be treated in two sections: the early Church to the Council of Chalcedon, and the medieval Church from Gregory I to just prior to the Reformation period.

 

H201 Patristics                                                                                  

The writings of the Fathers of the Church are fundamental to a proper understanding of the theological development of the early Christian Church.  This course will examine the writings of the early Church Fathers, with particular emphasis on their interpretation and use of Scripture, and the development of order and disciple in the Church. It will supplement the material seen in H-200, by concentrating on the primary texts of the Fathers

 

H202 Church History: The Reformation to the Present              

This survey course will examine the major events, personalities and forces that shaped the Christian Church from the Reformation period to the present day. Developments in Anglicanism and Lutheranism, as well as the Protestantism of the Radical Reformation and developments in Roman Catholicism and Eastern and Oriental Orthodoxy in both Europe and North America will be examined.

 

T210 Introduction to Ascetical Theology                           

An introduction to the classic vocabulary and theological understanding of the spiritual life. The student will become familiar with the essential concepts, and be exposed to the most important elements of the spiritual life in the history of the Church, with a strong emphasis on the writings and ideas most influential in the Anglican Catholic tradition.

 

T220 Ascetical Theology and Spiritual Direction                          

Building on the course work undertaken in the deaconate studies, as well as the student’s rule of life, this course will draw the student into a greater understanding of the importance of spirituality in the Christian life. Schools of spiritual direction will be studied as well as the various aspects of ascetical theology applicable to priestly life and the pastoral ministry.  This course will also study the ministry of a father confessor, including the administration of the Sacrament of Penance and the etiquette of the confessional.

 

T230 Theology Proper (God, the Trinity), Cosmology & Anthropology

A study of the teaching of the Church on God, creation, and man, looking at the main terms, ideas, and categories which the Church has used in explaining her fundamental teachings on them, and the implications of these for the Christian life.

 

T240 Christology & Soteriology                                                     

This course will cover Christology and Soteriology: the teaching in Holy Scripture and the Tradition of the orthodox catholic Christ concerning the Person and Work of Jesus Christ.

 

T250 Ecclesiology & Eschatology

This course will cover in detail the way in which the Mystery of the Trinity, revealed in Christ, is made present in the Eucharistic understanding of being as Communion, the Church of God. The orthodox catholic understanding of the Church, held in Anglicanism, as both local and universal, will be explored and unpacked.  The understanding of the four Last Things will also be examined, and the breaking into time of eternity in the liturgy will be explored.

 

T260 Sacramental Theology

This course is an examination of the Sacraments. The student will explore the ideas and vocabulary used by the Church to explain the meaning of the Sacraments. Their Scriptural origins will be explored, with emphasis on how they have been understood in the Anglican Catholic Tradition.

 

C201 Introduction to World Religions                                           

This course is a survey of, and introduction to, world religions. It will introduce the student to a variety of traditions from south and east Asia, as well as to those traditions which are predominant in the West. The religions to be examined include indigenous religious traditions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Japanese and Chinese religions, Judaism and Islam.

 

PR200 Liturgical and Practical ministry of a Priest/Practical Training in Liturgy                   

This course will study the practical application of the student’s theological studies to the liturgical and pastoral ministry of a ministerial priest. Students will learn, through both academic and hands-on practice how to perform the various liturgical functions required of a priest, including the Divine Offices, celebration of the Mass, administration of the sacraments, and other special services.  The course work in practical theology includes, as part of the course, field work and a short term meeting at a satellite location for practical, hands on work under the supervision of a qualified priest.

 

PR 201 Pastoral Theology                                                               

A study of the main principles and ideas involved in pastoral care, according to the historic understanding of the Church. Emphasis will be placed on pastoral ministry to the sick and dying, pastoral counseling, ministering to those preparing for baptism, confirmation and marriage. Practical supervision of the course will be involved, and coordinated with a supervising priest.

 

PR 205 Parish Ministry and Administration

An investigation of the basics of running a parish. This will include discussions of how to manage finances, run a vestry meeting, prepare bulletins and newsletters, principles of conflict management, and how to develop and propagate the parish’s vision for the Gospel.

 

Electives

B110 Ecclesiastical Latin  

A study in the basic elements of Church Latin, including vocabulary, grammar and syntax, and the proper use of standard language tools for understanding the Church’s theological and liturgical texts.

 

C200 Islam   

An exploration of the history of Islam, its main teachings and practices, using the primary texts of the Qur’an, as well as the Hadith and the Tafsirs. The impact of Islam on the Christian Church and on society in general will also be investigated.

 

PR 204 Advanced Homiletics                                                          

The student will further study and practice of how to prepare and deliver effective sermons.  Students will be provided the tools and practice needed to prepare and deliver sermons throughout the Church Year, as well as on special occasions. Sermons will be prepared and delivered, then discussed and critiqued.

 

PR 250 Fundamentals of Church Music     

This course covers practical aspects of Church music. It will briefly examine Church music in history and practice, including an overview of various hymnals and other materials in use in the Traditional Anglican Communion, guidance on various forms of chanting (and resources for learning to chant, and to chant well), and treatment of the practical and theological importance of sacred music in the life of the Church.